COVID-19 & Renters

Currently, there is an eviction moratorium in place for certain Virginia renters until at least June 30, 2021, pursuant to an extension of the CDC order and language in the Virginia budget. Certain Virginia renters can also ask for a 60-day eviction stay. Landlords with four or more dwelling units must offer renters behind on their rent a payment plan option




CARES Act Section 4023: Renters in Federally-Backed Multifamily Properties

Sections 4023(d) and (e) (15 U.S.C. 9057(d)-(e)) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, or CARES, Act created certain protections for renters in properties with federally-backed multifamily mortgage loans against evictions. A multifamily property is defined as a property having 5 or more dwelling units.

Under section 4023(d), the borrower (i.e. the landlord) of a mortgage on a multifamily property who receives a forbearance under the CARES Act may not, for the period of forbearance:

  • Evict, or start the eviction process, of a tenant solely due to failure to pay rent or other fees or charges, or
  • Charge any late fees, penalties, or other charges for late payment of rent.

Under section 4023(e), the borrower must give at least 30 days in a notice to vacate to a tenant before the tenant is required to vacate the dwelling unit, and can't issue that notice to vacate until after the expiration of the forbearance.

As of August 6, 2020, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) requires borrowers with mortgages backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac who enter into new or modified forbearance periods to inform tenants in writing about the protections available to tenants. In addition, borrowers must allow tenants flexibility to repay back rent over time and not in a lump sum.

On June 3, 2021, the FHFA announced that it was extending COVID-19 forbearance to qualifying multifamily property owners through September 30, 2021, along with the associated protections for tenants.

Click here to find out if your dwelling unit is backed by a Fannie Mae loan, and here to find out if it's backed by a Freddie Mac loan.

Use the National Low Income Housing Coalition's look-up tool here to see if the multifamily property you are renting in is subject to the CARES Act.



CARES Act Section 4024: Renters in Any Covered Rental Property

NOTE: The temporary eviction moratorium under section 4024 expired July 24, 2020. See sections below for other protections available.

Section 4024 (15 U.S.C. 9058) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, or CARES, Act created a temporary moratorium on eviction filings regarding renters in covered rental properties.

Covered properties includes any property that:

  • Participates in a federal housing program (most are covered, the complete list can be found at 34 U.S.C. 12491(a)(3)),
  • Participates in a rural housing voucher program,
  • Has a federally backed mortgage loan, or
  • Has a federally backed multifamily mortgage loan.

Under section 4024(b), during the 120-day period beginning on March 27, 2020, the landlord cannot:

  • Make any filing with a court to begin a legal action to recover possession of the dwelling unit due to the tenant's nonpayment of rent or other fees or charges, or
  • Charge fees, penalties, or other charges to the tenant related to the nonpayment of rent.

Under section 4024(c), the landlord must give at least 30 days in a notice to vacate to a tenant before the tenant is required to vacate the dwelling unit, and can't issue that notice to vacate until the eviction filing moratorium period is over.



Federal Eviction Moratorium Periods

On March 28, 2021, the CDC ordered that its moratorium be extended until June 30, 2021. See more below.

On August 27, 2020, HUD announced that evictions of tenants from properties secured by FHA-insured Single Family mortgages were suspended until December 31, 2020.

In addition, on August 27, 2020, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced that it was extending the eviction moratorium for renters in foreclosed homes which were acquired by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac until at least December 31, 2020. On December 2, 2020, the FHFA extended the moratorium to at least January 31, 2020.

The original temporary moratorium on eviction filings created by section 4024 of the CARES Act expired on July 24, 2020 (the end of the 120 day period beginning on March 27, 2020).



CDC Temporary Eviction Moratorium

What is the order and when does it expire?

On September 4, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ordered a moratorium on residential evictions through December 31, 2020. Renters who meet certain conditions and provide a sworn declaration are covered by the moratorium.

On December 27, 2020, President Trump signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (also known as the COVID relief act in news media) into law. This Act extended the CDC Order's temporary halt in residential evictions until January 31, 2021.

On January 29, 2021, the CDC ordered that its moratorium be extended until March 31, 2021. Read answers to FAQs here.

On March 28, 2021, the CDC ordered that its moratorium be extended until June 30, 2021.

What do I need to do as a renter?

The Order halts residential evictions for nonpayment of rent. Unlike the first moratorium created by the CARES Act, the Order does not prevent landlords from charging fees, penalties or interest on non-paid or late rent, nor does it prevent landlords from starting the eviction process in court.

Renters need to meet the following requirements to be able to take advantage of the CDC's eviction moratorium under the March 28, 2021 order:

  • The renter has used best efforts to obtain all available government assistance for rent or housing;
  • The renter either (i) earned no more than $99,000 (or $198,000 if filing jointly) in 2020, or expects to earn no more than $99,000 (or $198,000 if filing jointly) in annual income for 2021, (ii) was not required to report any income in 2020 to the IRS, or (iii) received an Economic Impact Payment (stimulus check);
  • The renter is unable to pay the full rent or make a full housing payment due to substantial loss of household income, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, a lay-off, or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses;
  • The renter is using best efforts to make timely partial payments that are as close to the full payment as the renter's circumstances may permit, taking into account other nondiscretionary expenses; and
  • Eviction would likely render them homeless — or force them to move into and live in close quarters in a new congregate or shared living setting — because they have no other available housing options.

The renter must also provide a signed declaration to their landlord that they meet the above requirements - the eviction moratorium is not automatic. The CDC has a sample form for use here.

A landlord who violates the CDC's Order may be subject to criminal penalties.

For Virginia renters: The CDC Order does not apply if there are already stronger state or local protections in place. There may be stronger protections in place for you; see more information below on Virginia eviction moratoriums and memos from the Executive Secretary to Virginia judges.

Get more information from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau here, and find the CDC's answers to FAQs here.



Virginia Eviction Moratoriums

According to a November 18, 2020 news release, the Virginia budget prohibits evictions for non-payment of rent through December 31, 2020, which is stronger than current federal protections. Landlords and tenants must cooperate and apply for rental assistance through the Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP) administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development. After January 1, 2021, the budget requires landlords and tenants to work together to access rent assistance, including through the RMRP, before proceeding with an eviction. See also the 60-Day Eviction Stay Under Va. Code § 44-209 section below.

Some localities may offer extra protections for renters. For example, in the County of Arlington, if you rent in one of the properties which is under a Limited Waiver Agreement with the County, the owner or management company may not charge late fees or evict tenants for non-payment of rent due to COVID-19 related loss of income through December 31, 2020.

(The eviction moratorium put in place by the Virginia Supreme Court expired on September 7, 2020.)



60-Day Eviction Stay Under Va. Code § 44-209

The Virginia legislature has also provided homeowners with some foreclosure protections by extending to them the protections of Va. Code § 44-209, which was created to give certain relief to government employees and contractors during federal government shutdowns. House Bill 340 (Chapter 1202) states that the protections under the statute relating to evictions for nonpayment of rent may be available to tenants affected by affected by COVID-19 during the period for which the Governor has declared a state of emergency.

Va. Code § 44-209(B) provides that a tenant who is a defendant in an unlawful detainer action in court (how evictions begin in Virginia) for failing to pay rent will be granted a 60-day continuance from the first court date, if the tenant appears on that court date and provides proof that the tenant has been affected by COVID-19.

"Affected by" is defined as a loss of income due to the COVID-19 emergency - the tenant must provide written proof that they are not currently receiving wages or payments from any public or private source. Written proof is (i) a paystub showing zero dollars in earnings for a pay period within the period for which the Governor has declared the COVID-19 state of emergency, (ii) a copy of a furlough notification letter or essential employee status letter indicating the employee's status as nonessential due to the emergency, or (iii) any other documentation deemed appropriate by the court.

This stay period is also tolled during the period of declared judicial emergency, which the Supreme Court of Virginia has currently extended to June 20, 2021.

These protections expire 90 days following the end of the state of emergency declared by the Governor.



Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP) & Rent Relief Program (RRP)

On February 16, 2021, Governor Northam announced $524 million in new funding for the Virginia Rent Relief Program, or RRP. (This program is replacing the Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP), as no new funding is being provided for mortgage payments through this program.)

Certain Virginia renters may be eligible for the Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP). Click here to learn more about the program.

Call 2-1-1 or click here to find out if you are eligible, and find more information here.



New Notice & Payment Plan Requirements

The Virginia legislature in House Bill 5064 amended Va. Code § 55.1-1245 of the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act regarding certain notices. These new provisions expire on July 1, 2021.

Under the new provisions, for a landlord who owns four or fewer rental units, if rent is unpaid when due, the landlord must provide a 14-day notice before starting the eviction process, compared to the standard 5-day notice.

For a landlord who owns four or more dwelling units, if rent is unpaid when due, the landlord must serve the tenant with a written notice of the total amount due and owed. The notice must also:

  • Offer the tenant a payment plan under which the tenant shall be required to pay the total amount due and owed in equal monthly installments over a period of the lesser of six months or the time remaining under the rental agreement. The total amount due and owed under a payment plan shall not include any late fees, and no late fees shall be assessed during any time period in which a tenant is making timely payments under a payment plan.
  • Inform the tenant that if the tenant fails to either pay the total amount due and owed or enter into the payment plan offered, or an alternative payment arrangement acceptable to the landlord, within 14 days of receiving the written notice from the landlord, the landlord may terminate the rental agreement and proceed to obtain possession of the premises.

If the tenant fails to pay in full or enter into a payment plan with the landlord within 14 days of the notice being served, the landlord may terminate the rental agreement and proceed to evict the tenant.

If the tenant enters into a payment plan and after the plan becomes effective, fails to pay any installment required by the plan within 14 days of its new due date, the landlord may terminate the rental agreement and proceed to evict the tenant, provided that the landlord has sent the tenant a new notice advising the tenant that the rental agreement will terminate unless the tenant pays the total amount due and owed as stated on the notice within 14 days of receipt.

The option of entering into a payment plan or alternative payment arrangement pursuant to this subsection may only be utilized once during the time period of the rental agreement.

Nothing in this subsection shall preclude a tenant from availing themselves of any other rights or remedies available to them under the law, nor shall the tenant's eligibility to participate or participation in any rent relief program offered by a nonprofit organization or under the provisions of any federal, state, or local law, regulation, or action prohibit the tenant from taking advantage of the payment plan.



Utility Shutoff Protections

According to a November 18, 2020 news release, the Virginia budget puts in place a moratorium on utility disconnections, including water and electricity, which will remain in effect until the Governor determines that the economic and public health conditions have improved such that the prohibition does not need to be in place or until at least 60 days after the declared state of emergency ends. The budget includes protections for utility providers dealing with revenue shortfalls and establishes a repayment plan to give customers the opportunity to pay off back debt over a longer period.



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Published November 24, 2020. Last updated June 11, 2021.